Discussion » Questions » Death and Dying » Can you really die from Covid-19 in a 4 day only infection from contracting it to dying?

Can you really die from Covid-19 in a 4 day only infection from contracting it to dying?

From catching it to dying.

Posted - November 21

Responses


  • 14672
    Yes, especially if you have underlying lung disease.
      November 21, 2020 1:36 PM MST
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  • 1737
    Imm..funny you should say that. A 63 year old coworker friend die at a health care center where he was treated after coughing out his esophagus. Rip roaring fine mid Sunday and dead by Thursday morning. Thanks for the info. Hey, what's the chance the new vaccine will work well for new cases of coronavirus? Huh? This post was edited by CosmicWunderkind at November 21, 2020 9:51 PM MST
      November 21, 2020 1:46 PM MST
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  • 5192
    Pfizer's vaccine sounds interesting.  It is not dead virus cells like all the others. I'm going to have because of that reason. As soon as possible. 

    This post was edited by Honeydew at November 22, 2020 7:53 AM MST
      November 21, 2020 1:51 PM MST
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  • 14672
    Both Pfizer and Moderna's vaccines seem to be 95% effective.  Pfizer has applied to the FDA for permission to distribute it on an emergency basis which would be those who already have been diagnosed and are in critical condition.  The serious problem with Pfizer's vaccine is that it needs to be kept at -94 F and that would mean that distribution centers would have to be upgraded or retrofitted.  Moderna's vaccine doesn't need such a specialized temperature and it would see that their vaccine could be rolled out sooner to more distribution centers.
      November 21, 2020 9:55 PM MST
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  • 5192
    Yes that is why this new vaccine is so important

    Nucleic acid vaccines work by providing the instructional genetic code for the body to make non-infectious viral bits and bobs that kick off an antibody response. So far, the only approved nucleic acid vaccine is for Ebola, which the FDA approved late last year; it uses a form of recombinant DNA to eventually generate immunity against the virus.

    The Pfizer/BioNTech uses another kind of nucleic acid called mRNA. As Quartz previously reported, mRNA vaccines provide a different bit of code for our cells to translate into bits of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which then solicit an immune response. It sneaks those instructions into our bodies using lipid nanoparticles that mimic other types of proteins our cells are used to letting through their membranes.

    The advantage of nucleic acid vaccines is that they can be developed shortly after researchers genetically sequence a pathogen; that could cut the development time from years down to months. The reason we haven’t had these kinds of vaccines before is because scientists struggled to figure out how to get nucleic acid vaccines into our cells where they could be utilized; without its fatty ferry, the genetic material would be destroyed like cellular waste.

    It seems like Pfizer and BioNTech were the first to crack this code; if it succeeds, others may follow in future pandemics.

     
    https://qz.com/1931483/is-the-pfizer-vaccine-a-live-virus/
      November 21, 2020 1:56 PM MST
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  • 14672
    The downside of Pfizer's vaccine is that it needs to be stored at an extremely low temperature which means that it couldn't be distributed to most centers that are up and running now.
      November 21, 2020 9:56 PM MST
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  • 387
    Not sure - But don't think I want to find out the hard way.
      November 21, 2020 2:30 PM MST
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  • 1737
    Me neither..Oh yeah. I can talk!:)
      November 21, 2020 5:40 PM MST
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  • 33626
    There was an instance (on the news) where a man showed symptoms one day and died the next.
      November 21, 2020 4:32 PM MST
    1

  • 11173
    I think the incubation period is longer than that, but a vic can be asymptomatic for a while before symptoms become evident - and some cases dever develop symptoms, which is why it's so hard to contain.
      November 21, 2020 4:55 PM MST
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  • 4344
    I'm not sure.
    Possibly yes in some cases.
    There is a new strain with a much shorter incubation phase; for people who are already ill, weak or immunocompromised that could be fatal.
      November 22, 2020 1:17 PM MST
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  • 1737
    Thanks

      November 22, 2020 1:26 PM MST
    0