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Discussion » Questions » Outside the Mug » In the event Donald Trump received jail sentence you think would be more suitable that he plead insanity and go to a mental institution?

In the event Donald Trump received jail sentence you think would be more suitable that he plead insanity and go to a mental institution?

I don't think he would survive too well in jail 

Posted - February 10

Responses


  • 1523
    Oh he'd be the best prisoner in the history of the world!  If Martha Stewart could do it .. I'm sure Donnie would make the most of it too.
      February 11, 2019 2:42 AM MST
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  • 38919
    Can you IMAGINE?  

    I never thought of that.  He would be an even bigger nightmare in jail than free.
      February 11, 2019 3:06 AM MST
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  • 1523
    And .. he'd put a spin on things to convince everyone he meant to be put in prison.  Pence and Huckleberry Sanders would say it was God's plan.  
      February 11, 2019 4:08 AM MST
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  • 3702
    That would be OK too. 
      February 11, 2019 6:09 AM MST
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  • 38919
    I don't think the criminal gets to plead insanity when the criminal is the president.

    I think the Congress could charge him as insane, but I don't think he can get off easier by pleading being nutso.

    But you are right.  That is the correct call. I think the nation is too embarrassed to admit we have a nutter in command.
      February 11, 2019 2:47 AM MST
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  • 3702
    No, I think a robust portion of “the nation” and a large segment of the rest of the world already admit it. 
      February 11, 2019 6:07 AM MST
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  • 38919
    Yes, Don B., but I was speaking more to the fact that they HAVE DONE NOTHING ABOUT IT.
      February 11, 2019 8:46 AM MST
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  • 3702
    Now that is another matter, and I agree. What can be done, given the state of stagnant, polarized partisanship? It won’t happen in any real way from Capital Hill.

    It will, of course, as with all important matters, come down to the will of the voters, with our increasingly maginalized power, to settle this...or worsen it. The consequences of bad choices should be a greater concern than in previous election cycles.  
      February 11, 2019 8:58 AM MST
    1

  • 38919
    And, therein lies the rub.
      February 11, 2019 10:04 AM MST
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  • 5731
    Disturbs me that people talk about jailing our president.  You don't like someone or agree with them so you just throw them in jail.   Just like in totalitarian countries.  
      February 11, 2019 5:44 AM MST
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  • 3702
    As if the President himself hasn’t chanted those very words against someone he disagrees with. 
    Remember “Lock her up!”?

    It’s called freedom of speech, welcome to America, dear. 
      February 11, 2019 6:05 AM MST
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  • 5731
    Freedom of speech is freedom to express ourselves and our opinions and views.  I don't see it as freedom to hate. I regard hate as a personal character flaw. This post was edited by officegirl at February 11, 2019 5:26 PM MST
      February 11, 2019 8:12 AM MST
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  • 3702
    What hate? This was a hypothetical question.

    If that is a tack you wish to take, supporting the current President, given his embrace of insult and divisiveness, paints you as either selectively biased or hypocritical.

    We are gifted with the right to speak our minds. That is not the case in totalitarian regimes (thanks for bringing them up). Imagining someone who is detestable to us being imprisoned is just as viable and permissable to any of us as it is to a candidate for public office to expound the same about his opponents. 

    Personally, I regard espousing cognitive dissonance as a personality flaw. 
      February 11, 2019 8:43 AM MST
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  • 5731
    So then you don't believe that much of what is expressed on this site stems from hatred?  In terms of being divisive why would not that have been more true of say Pres. Obama who with that "ObamaCare" at one stroke created an artificial division be mandating that some of us need to pay more for the same services than others?  Was that not divisive?  Different systems for different people, different rules for different people.  Or should that not be considered an :insult" to people who have worked hard all our lives to make something of ourselves? 

    Not smart enough to have any idea what "cognitive dissonance" but I guess those of you who consider yourselves smarter can just raise the ante to push me out of the game.  Which no doubt I should never have even tried to get into.  I know whatever I post will always be regarded as "selectively biased" or "hypocritical" because I don't count with you.  Which is why I tend to go with those few I do matter to.  Or who pretend I matter. 
      February 11, 2019 9:29 AM MST
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  • 3702
    I don’t presume to judge other people’s motives, I can, however recognize contradictions and falsehoods in an argument. (For the sake of discussion, “argument“ means one’s position) Such as what I identified in your post. 

    Obamacare, while endorsed by Obama, was not written by his hand. The credit or blame is not his alone. It is a flawed plan, one forged in the absence of any other plan. I don’t endorse it, but I recognize that millions gained medical coverage who otherwise would be without. There is much to correct in that plan. It is not, IMO, an exercise in divisiveness. To jump right to “insult” indicates to me a level of misunderstanding of intent.

    As far as the last paragraph of your reply, it is to my eyes a resignation to inflexible biases. Partisanship by default. Why not examine the counterpoints instead of simply finding offense in them. There is value in learning from those whose views are different, as opposed to simply writing off “smarter” people as beyond your ken. This post was edited by Don Barzini at February 11, 2019 10:04 AM MST
      February 11, 2019 10:00 AM MST
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  • I love how the "hate' card is tossed into the faces of those who speak ill of Trump.   When Obama was Prez, all of that went out the window and hating was OK by them.
      February 11, 2019 8:15 AM MST
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  • 3702
    It’s only certain parties here who resort to this argument, lacking any coherent recourse.
    Play the victim. 
      February 11, 2019 8:45 AM MST
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  • Yep, it's an epidemic.
      February 11, 2019 8:47 AM MST
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  • 1523
    I have to agree with Don.  Trump loves to suggest that anyone who disagrees with him should be fired or locked up or somehow stopped.  Anyone who breaks the law should be subject to penalties .. and I would think a President should be held to an even higher standard of conduct since he sets the tone for our country and even the rest of the world.  Double standards reign supreme in his administration.
      February 11, 2019 7:17 AM MST
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  • 5731
    But who has he had jailed for disagreeing with him?  I can find no instances of that.  Someone gets elected and even if I don't agree with him I respect them for that and give them their shot.  I have never seen anything like this campaign of excoriation in my life.  Also don't agree with this "higher standard" of conduct theory.  The important thing is a president is one of us.  Standards of conduct are personal moral choices and seems to me we can't force our own choices on others and expect to remain free.  And when has any president ever "set the tone for the country and the rest of the world"?  Obama? Bush father or son? Reagan, Clinton, Carter?  Etc. etc.  So much wishful thinking.  Do people sit around and wait for what any president does and just copy them?  No we all have lives of our own to lead.  As does our president. 
      February 11, 2019 8:11 AM MST
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  • 3702
    I don’t think Trump would ever plead insanity, as it is squarely against his mantra of not admitting weakness or error. 

    Frankly, I don’t see Trump doing any time. His wealth and disciples would allow him to tie up litigation for years. Failing that, (sadly) he’ll never see GenPop like Bill Cosby. The worst part will be the river of Twitter invective. 

    I suggest the public disgrace of a dishonorable departure from the Presidency, and subsequent pariah-hood might be the best we could hope for. For the few years he has left. At least the public disgrace part is already on track. This post was edited by Don Barzini at February 11, 2019 7:17 AM MST
      February 11, 2019 6:01 AM MST
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  • 7860
    Pence will pardon him, as Ford did Nixon.
      February 11, 2019 6:05 AM MST
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  • 5724
    What's the crime? There is none. Just some media garbage. Move over Bill Clinton, you have a new cell mate.
      February 11, 2019 6:11 AM MST
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  • 7860
    Obstruction of justice, multiple counts. That's what Nixon was about to be nailed on, before he got smart and quit. Trump isn't that smart. 
      February 11, 2019 6:13 AM MST
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