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Discussion » Questions » Communication » It is proper to call a "non-celebrity" a "civilian"?

It is proper to call a "non-celebrity" a "civilian"?

I was flipping channels. 
And a game show description said
"teams of celebrities and civilians compete."

Posted - January 31

Responses


  • 46231
    Really?  That is so snowflake of ya.
      January 31, 2020 12:51 PM MST
    3

  • 21359
    I have never heard it used that way. It is a military vs non military term. 
    I was interested to see what others thought. 
    I put you down as don't care. 
      January 31, 2020 2:14 PM MST
    0

  • 4410
    I've also heard it used in police vs non-police, and fire/medical personnel vs non.
    (both of which are organized along psuedo-military commands, so I guess it follows)
      January 31, 2020 2:22 PM MST
    1

  • 21359
    I have heard it used that way. I did not think about it. 
    I googled and got this explanation:
    civilian is "a person who is not a member of the police, the armed forces, or a fire department". The definition distinguishes from persons whose duties involve risking their lives to protect the public at large from hazardous situations such as terrorism, riots, conflagrations, and wars.
      January 31, 2020 2:46 PM MST
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  • 1861
    That's kind of an odd way to describe we peons!   Maybe better than "average Joe's".  
      January 31, 2020 1:45 PM MST
    1

  • 21359
    I thought the same thing. 
    Why not say people compete with teams of celebrities?
      January 31, 2020 2:16 PM MST
    1

  • 1861
    Good question.  Someone in PR thought it was a good label.
      January 31, 2020 3:24 PM MST
    1

  • 4410
    I guess they can use it that way.
    But what would happen if they had a "non-civilian, non-celebrity" - such as a member of the military?  LOL
      January 31, 2020 2:23 PM MST
    2

  • 21359
    I doubt they change description based on the contestants. So it would be wrong. Lol This post was edited by my2cents at January 31, 2020 2:39 PM MST
      January 31, 2020 2:39 PM MST
    0

  • 2854
    I prefer the term "Citizen", thank you
      January 31, 2020 2:42 PM MST
    2

  • 21359
    I agree. I just seen it used on the TV's guide.
      January 31, 2020 2:47 PM MST
    1

  • 13138
    *saw*  Please!
      February 1, 2020 12:26 AM MST
    1

  • 1175
    I think within a narrow definite context, calling some people "civilians" to distinguish them from people of relevant status (e.g. participants/coaches/staff/etc. at a sporting event versus the general public) conveys the meaning in a shorthand way, even if it isn't technically accurate.
      January 31, 2020 5:56 PM MST
    1

  • 13138
    I don't like the way it sounds.  Dictionary says a civilian is anyone who is not in the military, a police officer, or a fire fighter.   
      February 1, 2020 12:28 AM MST
    1