Discussion » Questions » Education » Can you guess any or all of the math & words here?

Can you guess any or all of the math & words here?

More kinds of guessing puzzle words here:

Try guessing all these logos if you can:


Now these pictures look small to guess the video games in, but try to guess them all of what video games each of there are please!

-And on the next quiz guessing thread, I will put all the next quiz puzzle game pictures all in just one picture, so that I don’t have to paste all of each of the pictures next time, & I will see if it will still be big enough to read-each ones.

Posted - September 1, 2022

Responses


  • 44343
    When it comes to stuff like those, I am quite the dullard. And lazy.
      September 1, 2022 5:35 PM MDT
    1

  • 2585
    It probably seem to feel to get much more practice than how much practice (you) been doing.
      September 2, 2022 10:29 AM MDT
    1

  • 44343
    When you said video games, you lost me.
      September 2, 2022 10:30 AM MDT
    0

  • 2585
    I didn’t see where I labeled as ‘any  Game’ here, but maybe these looks pretty close to video games here-in pictures?
      September 2, 2022 11:07 AM MDT
    0

  • 737


      September 1, 2022 9:33 PM MDT
    1

  • 737
      September 1, 2022 9:35 PM MDT
    1

  • 737
      September 1, 2022 9:37 PM MDT
    1

  • 737
      September 1, 2022 9:40 PM MDT
    1

  • 737
      September 1, 2022 9:50 PM MDT
    1

  • 737

    Adidas, Bacardi, Champion, Dove, Jägermeister, Louis Vuitton, Twitter, Gucci.

    Allianz, Batman, Chanel, DreamWorks, James Bond, Pepsi, Wikipedia, McDonald's.

    Android, Bic, Circle K, Firefox, KFC, Reebok, Apple,
    Superman.

    Audi, Carrefour, Posthorn, Chrome, Kmart,
    Taco Bell, Garnier, Yahoo.
      September 2, 2022 1:57 AM MDT
    1

  • 2585
    Flint
    The 32 logos to guess here, you got all the rest of it right, except one you guessed wrong, so I just clicked in to reveal just that one answer that uses 5 hints, but I now opened-up a new level of logos.
    Here’s another one:
      September 4, 2022 6:19 PM MDT
    0

  • 737
    Host

      September 5, 2022 1:15 AM MDT
    0

  • 737
    Barley

      September 5, 2022 1:19 AM MDT
    0

  • 737
    145

      September 5, 2022 1:23 AM MDT
    0

  • 737
    Silent Hill


      September 5, 2022 1:26 AM MDT
    0

  • 737
    Alice in Wonderland
      September 5, 2022 1:33 AM MDT
    0

  • 3684
    Of that lot, I identified 9 out of the 32 trade-marks and that was about it!

    I do not play video games so am a non-starter there. The number / letter puzzles defeated me but I can't help thinking they are not quite what they seem!

    Here's a "series" with two gaps. I would expect very few non-Britons to know at all, and not many Britons nowadays to identify and complete (and that statement is a hint):

    1/4,   1/2,   1,   2,  --,  6,  12,  24,  30,  --,  120,  240,  1200,  2400,  4800


    Answers below...


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    Keep scrolling....

    PPP

    aerq

    zv


    ...

    %%^&

    this is probably deep enough.

    another line or two to be on the...

       .. safe side...


    Answer


    It is not an arithmetical or geometrical progression, but was the number of Pennies in the pre-decimal British currency units (so before 1971), in coins and notes from the Farthing to the £20 note. The farthing had already disappeared, in the 1960s.

    The two missing ones are 3 and 60, highlighted. The set with their names ( and nick-names in parentheses), and the three primary values in italics (forming the "£ s. d.") is:


    1/4    Farthing,
    1/2    Halfpenny ("Ha'penny"' or "Ha'pence"; the 'ha' rhymed with 'hay') 
    1       Penny,  (never 'pence' on its own. 'Pence' is plural but using it for the 1p alone came in with the new decimal penny.
    2      Two-pence ('Tuppence'),
    3       ('Thruppence'),
    6,      Sixpence ('Tanner')
    12     Shilling ('Bob'),
    24     Two Shillings ('Two Bob'),
    30     Two-and-six, Florin, or Half-a-Crown,
    60     Crown, or Five Shillings - a rather unusual one.

    The above were all coins. Now to the notes, and we retain those of £5 and above as notes, albeit in different designs, with £1 divided into 100p:

    120    Ten Shillings ('Ten  Bob'),
    240    £1 or One Pound ('Quid'),
    1200  £5 ('Fiver')
    2400  £10 ('Tenner'),
    4800  £20  - if you had two of those in your 1971 weekly wage-packet, you were quite well-paid!


    The modern "Pence" series is 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 (= £1), 200 in coins; 500, 1000, 2000 in notes.

    The £50 note is rarely seen, and though legal tender, some shops will not accept it. This post was edited by Durdle at September 12, 2022 5:32 PM MDT
      September 12, 2022 5:29 PM MDT
    0