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Danilo_G
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Discussion » Questions » Current Events and News » Is it the car manufacturers fault their cars are too tempting to steal?

Is it the car manufacturers fault their cars are too tempting to steal?

MN AG seems to think so.

"But we have to go upstream, and we got to make sure that the automobiles are not so easy to steal that they are a tempting, attractive nuisance for young people. Right now we are investigating two major automakers because their cars are dramatically too easy to steal for young people," he claimed.

Posted - March 26

Responses


  • 1361
    I think it's the ease of theft that makes them more tempting targets. Cars use electronic signals now that are fairly simple to mimic with other devices. I'd rather hold the manufacturers responsible for that than the buyers. 
      March 26, 2024 5:07 AM MDT
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  • 32643
    That is like blaming the home owner for getting robbed because the front door was open. 

    We have to put the blame where it belongs....the thief is to blame for their actions. 
      March 26, 2024 6:37 AM MDT
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  • 1361
    No, it's blaming the home owner who guaranteed the door was secure and that it didn't need further improvements, when it can actually be unlocked by anyone who wants to.
      March 26, 2024 8:12 AM MDT
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  • 32643
    If the car has a safety issue, then there should be a recall for that.  

    But regardless if a crime is easy to do, it is always the persons CHOICE to commit that crime. 

    Garage door openers are the same way, if you leave factory code on them.  But again, not the Garage door manufacturer fault,  nor the home owners, the fault is the criminal who chooses to steal.
      March 27, 2024 4:33 AM MDT
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  • 1361
    The thief is responsible for the theft. I think we can agree on that. But it doesn't negate that manufacturers have a responsibility towards buyers.
      March 27, 2024 4:45 AM MDT
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  • 32643
    Good  I am glad we agree. 

    The point of my question was the MN AG doesn't agree, he is blaming the car manufacturer for making it 'tempting and attractive " to young people to steal the car. 
      March 27, 2024 5:05 AM MDT
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  • 9854
    Yes, I think car owners have a right to expect that their car can't be started with a USB cable (how-to videos available on Tik Tok). Car buyers didn't know at the time of purchase that their insurance rates would skyrocket. The electronic signal theft is a separate issue and is similar to what is happening with tap to pay credit cards. There are things people can do to block the signals, but if a car manufacturer doesn't install basic anti-theft devices, the car becomes more attractive to someone looking to steal a car. They will choose the Kia or Hyundai over other makes.
      March 26, 2024 7:46 AM MDT
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  • 1361
    I didn't even consider the insurance rates, or know about the USB cables. This is a rather foreign issue to me, since many here still use the Bronze-Age technology to lock their cars. You're spot-on, Jane; not that I'm surprised.
      March 26, 2024 8:10 AM MDT
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  • 2709
    I have a 10-year old Hyundai.  Back then, what was offered to deter theft was an engine cutoff switch if you didn't start the car with the right key.  That was good enough for me and I do get a discount from GEICO for the anti-theft device. 
      March 26, 2024 10:53 AM MDT
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  • 9854
    These issues are newer, and apply only to certain models and years. Some insurance companies stopped issuing new policies on the affected cars. My Hyundai is one of those years and models, but because it has the keyless start, it has the engine immobilizer. Hyundai has finally started doing fixes after many lawsuits. 
      March 26, 2024 12:14 PM MDT
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  • 2709
    I did get the notice from Hyundai to bring the car in and when I did, they said I was OK.  Now car thieves will have to find some other manufacturers' cars to steal. This post was edited by Spunky at March 29, 2024 7:37 PM MDT
      March 27, 2024 10:49 AM MDT
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  • 9854
    Yes.
      March 26, 2024 7:47 AM MDT
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  • 17395
    I think this is a situation that falls to industry custom and standard, rather than fault.  So, if it is a safety feature particularly, if "everybody's doing it" you better do it too. 
      March 26, 2024 8:51 AM MDT
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  • 22896
    Everyone's input here has been very helpful and insightful to me. Thank you.
    I'm very unaware of many of these details with which many of you have "lived with" with your own vehicles and/or knowing about it all in general.


    My own admittedly naive answer  is that regardless of "things" out there, easy or not, the choice for me to steal is my own choice.

    Be Well, All.
      March 26, 2024 5:21 PM MDT
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  • 9854
    It goes without saying that the perpetrators are responsible for their criminal actions. What the MN AG is investigating is whether consumer protection laws were violated when car manufacturers cut costs by not installing industry standard engine immobilizers on certain vehicles. This encouraged car thieves to target certain cars over others or to steal more cars than they would have otherwise.  It is not about turning good citizens into car thieves by creating an irresistible temptation. 
      March 27, 2024 7:27 AM MDT
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  • 32643
    This was not simply an interview about failure of car manufacturers to secure their cars. 

    It was blaming them for crimes.  He goes on about going upstream to the people in the country clubs as well. And criticizing the right for just wanting to punish the criminals.  

    If the cars are faulty force a recall and have them fix it. If the country club members are involved by all means we want them punished as well.  But do not make excuses for the criminals.
      March 29, 2024 8:55 AM MDT
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  • 9854
    I can't comment on an interview that I have not seen. But I agree that if a car owner cannot secure the vehicle, then force the auto manufacturers to fix the issue. That is what Minnesota and 18 other states are doing. This is a huge burden on law enforcement. No one says the car thieves aren't to blame and shouldn't be punished - that would be stupid. The problem here can be compared to drivers leaving the key in the ignition, it's wrong to steal the car, but a sensible person takes steps to protect their property. Hyundai and Kia made it difficult to do so. You can keep on arguing, but it doesn't change the fact that is you leave valuables unsecured, they're probably going to be stolen.

    https://www.ag.state.mn.us/Office/Communications/2023/03/02_KiaHyundai.asp
      March 29, 2024 11:57 AM MDT
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  • 32643
    You and I have different views on what he meant by tempting young people to steal a car then...but that is nothing new. 
    The interview was with Al Sharpton on MSDNC. 
      March 29, 2024 3:26 PM MDT
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  • 9854
    Nothing could get me to watch Al Sharpton.  
      March 29, 2024 5:24 PM MDT
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  • 32643
    Something we agree on....:)
      March 29, 2024 7:54 PM MDT
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  • 22896
    Well said. That helped me more.
      March 29, 2024 7:35 PM MDT
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  • 22896
    Thanks for a Pick!  :)   
      March 29, 2024 7:36 PM MDT
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