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Danilo_G
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What is acceleration due to gravity at your house?

At my house it’s 9.80424 m/s².  This question was inspired by Spunky’s reply to this question: https://answermug.com/forums/topic/139919/if-i-were-to-lock-you-in-the-dungeon-and-make-you-homework-chall  and Martina’s reply to this question: https://answermug.com/forums/topic/139911/you-hear-randy-d-has-hurt-himself-in-some-way-in-the-room-next-d/view/post_id/981238 

Posted - March 6, 2023

Responses


  • 16294
    9796985.05 micrometres per second per second at the Kensington Cricket Club, the closest gravitational calibration point to my house.
      March 7, 2023 4:02 AM MST
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  • 5453

    I’m giving you Asker’s Pick for giving me a better answer than I expected.  I actually didn’t think anyone was going to answer this with an exact value.

    The closest gravitational calibration point to my house is 9804521.2 μm/s², so it’s close to what the online calculator gave me when I entered the latitude and elevation of my house.


    This post was edited by Livvie at December 2, 2023 12:55 PM MST
      March 7, 2023 11:57 AM MST
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  • 2856
    Do you mean how quickly my tatas gravitated towards my waist?
      March 7, 2023 8:27 AM MST
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  • 5453
    I won’t ask how quickly, but if you really want to let us know…
      March 7, 2023 11:59 AM MST
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  • 2856
    A lot faster than I thought possible!
      March 8, 2023 6:29 AM MST
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  • 44308
    9.8 is close enough. I do not know the exact radius of Earth from my house.
      March 7, 2023 11:32 AM MST
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  • 5453
    I know the elevation and latitude of my house so I got it from https://www.sensorsone.com/local-gravity-calculator/
      March 7, 2023 11:42 AM MST
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  • 44308
    Lame. It is an easy calculation if you know Earth's mass and the mass of your house.
      March 8, 2023 7:25 AM MST
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  • 1409
    I love this scientist talk, haha. It's easy - just measure your house in kilograms, Livvie! Gah!
      March 8, 2023 4:46 PM MST
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  • 44308
    Not easy. I just use my mass...about 68kg.
      March 8, 2023 4:52 PM MST
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  • 13261
    How is that measured? And isn’t it the same everywhere?
      March 8, 2023 7:06 AM MST
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  • 44308
    No. It depends on the radius of the earth at your location and altitude.
      March 8, 2023 7:28 AM MST
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  • 13261
    How is it measured? And what about the 32 feet per second downward acceleration per second I learned in high school physics?
      March 8, 2023 10:04 AM MST
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  • 44308
    F = G(m1m2)/R^2, where F is the force of gravity, G is the Universal gravitational constant (6.67x 10^-11), m1 and m2 are the masses between the two objects and R is the distance between them.
    In the case of Earth's gravity, all you need is the radius and mass of the earth and the mass of an object at the surface. Metric system is used at all times. F is measured in Newtons.




      March 8, 2023 1:51 PM MST
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  • 13261
    Huh? Too complicated for the average adult.
      March 8, 2023 4:12 PM MST
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  • 44308
    My students could do it. With a good scientific calculator it is quite simple. Plug and chug. Wiki can provide the radius and mass.
      March 8, 2023 4:34 PM MST
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  • 13261
    But what use is there for such information, and see if they still know how or care when they’re 20-30 years out of school.
      March 8, 2023 5:11 PM MST
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  • Livvie and Slartibartfast still know and care. They're both out of school.
      March 9, 2023 8:59 PM MST
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  • 44308
    Love you.
      December 1, 2023 7:42 PM MST
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  • 16294
    9.8m/s/s (or 32ft in the archaic units the US still insists on using) is an approximate, but is based on the assumption that the Earth is a perfect sphere, which it's not. G is dependent on exactly how far one is from Earth's absolute centre, altitude and the fact that the planet is slightly oblate (ie bulges at the equator) means that G changes. You're heavier at the North pole than you are on top of Aconcagua. This post was edited by Slartibartfast at December 1, 2023 7:43 PM MST
      March 8, 2023 4:50 PM MST
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  • 13261
    But who cares? What practical use is there for such information?
      March 8, 2023 5:12 PM MST
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  • 16294
    Crucial in terms of precision balances (for radioisotopes) or guiding spacecraft. A few microns off at Earth's surface can equal thousands of miles at the destination. Local G is always taken into account at Cape Canaveral and the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.
      March 8, 2023 5:27 PM MST
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  • 13261
    Which more than 99% of the population have no interest or involvement in. No wonder most of us don’t care or need to know.
      March 8, 2023 6:54 PM MST
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  • 44308
    Then why do you continue to chime in?
      December 1, 2023 7:45 PM MST
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