Active Now

Thebigd
Nanoose
Shuhak
excon
Trump is toast tic tic tic tic
RosieG
Kittigate
SaltyPebble
Adaydreambeliever
Randy D
my2cents
Baba
Discussion » Questions » Legal » If all Americans are equal, why must folks rise when a judge or other official enters the room? Tradition? I wouldn't rise for the 't' word.

If all Americans are equal, why must folks rise when a judge or other official enters the room? Tradition? I wouldn't rise for the 't' word.

That is, of course, moot, as I would never attend anything it was going to attend.

Posted - December 1

Responses


  • 2939
    It's a sign of respect for the law and the judicial system.
      December 1, 2019 5:45 PM MST
    7

  • 26557
    That is the standard answer. What about the respect for my individual right to not stand? I am not required to respect the laws...only follow them. This post was edited by Element 99 at December 1, 2019 6:17 PM MST
      December 1, 2019 5:47 PM MST
    2

  • 2939
    Unfortunately, I think we lose that in the courtroom, unless obviously disabled.
      December 1, 2019 5:51 PM MST
    2

  • 26557
    That implies I am not equal to the judge. Are they going to arrest me? For what?
      December 1, 2019 5:55 PM MST
    2

  • 2939
    I imagine that you might be warned that if you don't stand you will be held in contempt of court. I believe the judge has discretion over the penalty imposed. You might be forcibly evicted from the room, or put in gaol for a few hours, or charged with an offence.
    In a sense, it's true that we are not equal when it comes to procedures within the legal system.

    But equality is also a state of mind. I see myself as equal to others, therefore I give them respect automatically. In the same way, I anticipate respectful behaviour from others because it's just normal decent behaviour. If someone is not respectful (rare) I leave and have nothing to do with them in future. This post was edited by bookworm at December 1, 2019 8:06 PM MST
      December 1, 2019 6:03 PM MST
    2

  • 26534

      Is a standard answer automatically wrong, bad, inaccurate, inappropriate, inadmissible?
    ~
      December 1, 2019 8:14 PM MST
    3

  • 26557
    It is the 'sheep' answer. Everyone says it...it must be true. Might be true...might not. I guess as I age, I become more cynical about such things.
      December 1, 2019 8:24 PM MST
    1

  • 26534
    I don’t know if you’ve raised any children, but if so, there may have been a tradition in your household wherein the parent(s) expected the children to follow the rules, right?  If not, the children quite possibly made the rules and the parent(s) has to follow them. 

    ~
      December 1, 2019 10:55 PM MST
    1

  • 26557
    I raised two. They followed by example. I never purposely ran a red light while they were in the car.
      December 2, 2019 7:02 AM MST
    0

  • 11952
    Who in their right mind respect the fools and bigots that make laws to suit the rich and powerful...The poor,working classes  and those that respect nature and the environment are the what we all need fair and unbiased kaws for....
    Who but the rich can afford legal council worth its salt....
    How can a poor man take a huge conglomerate to court and expect a fair hearing.....

    We have Prince Andrew who was friend with a peadophill and having sex with very young girls ...Do you think he will ever face justice and ever be found guilty by one of our countries high paid lackies....I think never will be the out come of that...
      December 1, 2019 6:21 PM MST
    3

  • 3532
    The symbolic purpose is to show the heightened status of the judge. Whether you respect him/her or not is irrelevant.

    (I know to you I may look old, hope this statement ain't too bold, but here come the judge!) This post was edited by Shuhak at December 1, 2019 6:17 PM MST
      December 1, 2019 5:50 PM MST
    2

  • 26557
    (Da judge.) Heightened status? Their status is no higher than yours or mine...and mine is no more important than that homeless guy on the corner.
      December 1, 2019 5:54 PM MST
    4

  • 3532
    Then again, neither is one's boss at work.  Yet we still treat then with respect (at least until we clock out).
      December 1, 2019 6:15 PM MST
    2

  • 11952
    Butt wat a bout me papa....:(  
      December 1, 2019 6:23 PM MST
    2

  • 26557
    I will always treat my dotters better than myself.
      December 1, 2019 6:26 PM MST
    2

  • 11952
    Hahahaha ....great retort for this little sort .....
    A "Sort" is a young bit of skirts slang terminology papa...   ....:) 
      December 1, 2019 6:40 PM MST
    2

  • 5379
    ain't isn't
      December 1, 2019 6:18 PM MST
    2

  • 26557
    In the case of what he wrote, isn't wouldn't sound right.
      December 1, 2019 6:28 PM MST
    2

  • 11952
    It's a case of ain't ain't right ,but it,is ....:)D.   Hehe 
      December 1, 2019 6:42 PM MST
    2

  • 5379
    But since "this statement" is singular, "isn't" is correct and thus sounds more right. For "these statements," "ain't" would be appropriate.
      December 1, 2019 6:57 PM MST
    2

  • 3532
    This post was edited by Shuhak at December 1, 2019 11:05 PM MST
      December 1, 2019 11:04 PM MST
    0

  • 26534

      All Americans are not equal, whether that is supposed to be true or not. Other than rising when a judge enters a courtroom, there are countless examples of exhibiting deference or respect to others based on demographics. For instance, and just one of dozens of them, in a jury trial, judges have all rise when the jury enters and leaves the courtroom. [Edit: And that includes the judge standing also.]

    Religious, familial, political, military, job-related, educational settings, etc., all have varying degrees of human interaction that requires people to demonstrate behaviors differently based on who they are. 

    ~ This post was edited by Randy D at December 1, 2019 11:10 PM MST
      December 1, 2019 6:13 PM MST
    4

  • 26557
    I guess my brain is trying to imagine a utopian world. All you have said is true, but you left out racism. I asked this question to get these kinds of answers. I remember in the Navy, when the captain entered, it was "Attention on deck." I had no problem with that, as I had great respect for all but one of my COs.
      December 1, 2019 6:23 PM MST
    0

  • 26534

      Race and/or racism is not the only aspect excluded in my response; there are potential countless others that are appropriate there also. 

      As for your own example of the commanding officer in the military setting and your willingness to show respect therein, don’t you contradict your own stance alluded to in your original post?  


    ~
      December 1, 2019 8:10 PM MST
    1